A Walk through the Shambles in York


When you walk around the stunning city of York, UK, you never know what you might find next! It’s the perfect city to visit for the female solo traveller, particularly if you are a history buff! Join me today for a walk down the Shambles, the most famous street in England.

Welcome to York

The walk along the river Ouse from Leeman Road to York city centre. This is my daily walk into town!
I’m based here in York when I’m not on the road. It’s a beautiful city to return to, and it’s good at keeping the wanderlust at bay, temporarily, at least! Most days, I take the walk down the River Ouse to York city centre.

I decided to get a city centre based office to increase my productivity and get me out of the house, in the few weeks before I head off to Scandanavia. I was having problems separating work and home life – this is the classic burden of being an entrepreneur.

Whip-Ma-Whop-Ma-Gate

My new office is located right next to The Shambles, and England’s best street name, Whip-ma-whop-ma-gate!
Whip-Ma-Whop-Ma-Gate in York, what a fab street name!
Hostels in York on HostelWorld.com

My York Based Office – ACollective

My current ‘digital nomad workspace’ ACollective, is a shared office space and hub for entrepreneurs, particularly the creative kind – web developers, designers, bloggers, video editors. I’m in my element!
Acollective
It also means that I’m not trying to do my work whilst watching TV, or putting my washing in when I’m supposed to be doing my work!

The Shambles, York

Yesterday, I walked down The Shambles. The Medieval style houses with wattle and daub windows extend outwards to save space and jut above the cobbled streets. This street was mentioned in the Doomsday book and many would argue that it is not only the most historical street in England, but the best preserved medieval street in the world.

The street is so narrow, in fact, that if you stand with your arms stretched either side of you, you can almost touch the houses on both sides!
Behind the Shambles, there’s a number of Tudor style shops and cafe’s as well as an outdoor market.

 

Shopping on The Shambles

Make sure that you stop by to get your gifts here. The Shambles contains some of the most unique and beautiful shops in York. I really love the Gift Gallery, because everything there is hand made in the York. Also, the chocolates from Monk Bar Chocolatiers are divine and make excellent gifts.
If you are interested in reading more about the independent shops of York, visit my article on 7 shops in York that you Cannot Miss.
I also highly recommend that you stop by for an English Tea at the Earl Grey Tea Rooms on the Shambles. It has a beautiful tea garden through the back, which is lovely in the summer.

A Blindfolded Unicycling Fire Juggler!

York brings so many pleasant surprises in the way of street entertainment. It attracts a great deal of performers and buskers. However, what I stumbled upon today really did take the biscuit!

When I reached Kings Square, I was greeted by, yes, you guessed it, a blindfolded unicycling fire juggler!


Other Things to See and Do in York

York is surrounded by Medieval City Walls, which are walkable in approximately 2 hours. Pretty much everything within the city walls is walkable. Just bear in mind that some of the cobbles, narrow streets are not so wheelchair friendly.
In the summer, York Museum Gardens host free Owl Flying shows at 1pm and 3pm.
York is also home to Europe’s largest gothic Cathedral, York Minster, which is an extremely special place to me, as it’s where my fiancé proposed. You might also like to read about York Christmas Market.
Have you ever visited the Shambles in York? Would you like to visit?  I’d love to hear your feedback.
Looking for Accommodation in York?
Places to Stay in York on TripAdvisor
Hotels in York on booking.com
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Hotels in York on Laterooms.com
Hostels in York on HostelWorld.com

Templeseeker

Hi, I'm Amy Trumpeter and I have over 25 years of travel experience. I love seeking out temples, Churches and other religious and historical buildings. I write mainly about Asia, Europe and North Africa. My BA (Religions and Theology) and MA (South Asian Studies) were gained from the University of Manchester. Come and join me on my templeseeking journey around the world!

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